Blog

Looking For a Job When You Already Have One

How To Look For A Job When You Have OneLooking for a job when you’re already employed is quite a juggling act. Job-hunting can seem like a fulltime job in itself and keeping your job search private from your employer is difficult particularly when trying to schedule interviews.  However the good news is that you already have an advantage as candidates already in a job are seen as more desirable than those who are unemployed.

Decide Where You Want A New Job

Before embarking on a job search it’s worth taking stock. Identify what you’re looking for: is it promotion, a sideways move to a different company, a change of direction? Be realistic, have you got the experience and/or qualifications to make this move, are there steps you can take to give yourself the best chance of fulfilling your goal?

Consider whether it’s necessary for you to move employers: are there opportunities for promotion where you currently work, is there flexibility to change your role and gain the responsibilities or challenges you’re looking for? Is your current employer open to a discussion about your career development? It could be favourable for both parties: they get to keep a valuable member of their team, you stay at a company you know and like.

Tidy Up Your CV

Wherever you decide to start your job search this is a great opportunity to update and clean up your CV, online folio and professional profile. But this should be done in your own time, not company time! Using your employers phone, email and their time for what essentially is personal usage is not advisable or professional. Instead you need to get organised and treat your job-hunting as a part-time job you do in your own time.

Do You Tell Your Current Employer?

You also need to decide whether to tell your current employer or not. While many employers will expect ambitious and talented employees to move around seeking new opportunities and fresh challenges every few years, this doesn’t necessarily mean they like it! However open-minded your current company may be, knowing that you’re actively looking for another job could change your relationship with them. On the other hand having a frank discussion with your boss could open up opportunities either in-house or externally that would otherwise not have presented themselves.

Do You Tell Your Colleagues?

If you decide that discretion is the way forward then choose very carefully whom you confide in. Telling colleagues is generally a bad idea however discreet they profess to be. At the same time it’s worth stressing to those you do tell that your plans are confidential. This is all the more important when our social and professional lives overlap on social media; a comment made by a friend can easily be seen by your boss.

Clean Up Your Social Media Profiles

While on the subject of social media this is the time to spring clean your online profiles. Facebook particularly is responsible for the downfall of many job hunters who haven’t deleted the incriminating holiday snaps they’ve been tagged in, or curbed their opinionated status updates before starting their job search. Now’s the time to have a look at your privacy settings and delete those unprofessional photos or comments.

Of course social media is a constructive tool in your job search when used proactively. A complete LinkedIn profile is 40 times more likely to receive approaches than incomplete profiles.  Devote some time to update your current experience stressing the key skills and attributes you need for the role you’re looking for. Identify the keywords that prospective recruiters use for the field you’re in and include these in your “Professional headline”. And to avoid flagging up your LinkedIn activity to your current employer, adjust your settings so that your connections are not alerted every time you update your status or change your profile.

Connecting With Prospective Employers

Social media is a very effective way of networking with prospective employers especially as you can use it 24/7. Follow, connect and “like” companies or individuals you’re interested in working with and build a relationship with them through sharing, comments and conversation. Join industry-related online groups to share in those conversations and to find out about events and job opportunities their members share. And sign up for job alerts from online job boards such as ours Source Creative Digital and Marketing Agency Jobs or I suppose (!)BrandRepublic.com .

Meeting Prospective Employers

While online networking’s very convenient when you’re in a fulltime job you can’t beat face-to-face contact. By attending industry events where you meet potential employers you have an excellent opportunity to impress and make solid connections with them. With both online and face-to-face networking it’s never a good idea to broadcast your job seeking blatantly (hints of desperation) instead indicate subtly that you’re open to interesting opportunities and new projects.

Recruitement Agencies Can Help You

Saving the best for last, recruitment agencies like Source are here to match candidates to their perfect job and jobs/companies to the perfect candidate. Contacting a recruiter who specialises in your field opens doors to jobs you may otherwise not hear of. A good recruitment agency has unparalleled knowledge and connections to the industry they work in. For the candidate this means you have someone working hard on your behalf to find you your next position. As an employed job hunter this expertise not only saves you time but also provides support during what can be a stressful period in your working life.

Move On Professionally

Finally when you have secured that new job remember not to burn your bridges – make sure you resignd and depart with good grace and professionalism. After all you never know where your next job opportunity might be and who might be doing the hiring.

I think most of us will have looked for a job whilst still in another job. Do you think this is good advice? I’d to love to hear some personal experiences – especially if you got caught out. How did that go?!

photo credit: woodleywonderworks via photo pin cc

Consider whether it’s necessary for you to move employers: are there opportunities for promotion where you currently work, is there flexibility to change your role and gain the responsibilities or challenges you’re looking for? Is your current employer open to a discussion about your career development? It could be favourable for both parties: they get to keep a valuable member of their team, you stay at a company you know and like.

Tidy Up Your CV

Wherever you decide to start your job search this is a great opportunity to update and clean up your CV, online folio and professional profile. But this should be done in your own time, not company time! Using your employers phone, email and their time for what essentially is personal usage is not advisable or professional. Instead you need to get organised and treat your job-hunting as a part-time job you do in your own time.

Do You Tell Your Current Employer?

You also need to decide whether to tell your current employer or not. While many employers will expect ambitious and talented employees to move around seeking new opportunities and fresh challenges every few years, this doesn’t necessarily mean they like it! However open-minded your current company may be, knowing that you’re actively looking for another job could change your relationship with them. On the other hand having a frank discussion with your boss could open up opportunities either in-house or externally that would otherwise not have presented themselves.

Do You Tell Your Colleagues?

If you decide that discretion is the way forward then choose very carefully whom you confide in. Telling colleagues is generally a bad idea however discreet they profess to be. At the same time it’s worth stressing to those you do tell that your plans are confidential. This is all the more important when our social and professional lives overlap on social media; a comment made by a friend can easily be seen by your boss.

Clean Up Your Social Media Profiles

While on the subject of social media this is the time to spring clean your online profiles. Facebook particularly is responsible for the downfall of many job hunters who haven’t deleted the incriminating holiday snaps they’ve been tagged in, or curbed their opinionated status updates before starting their job search. Now’s the time to have a look at your privacy settings and delete those unprofessional photos or comments.

Of course social media is a constructive tool in your job search when used proactively. A complete LinkedIn profile is 40 times more likely to receive approaches than incomplete profiles.  Devote some time to update your current experience stressing the key skills and attributes you need for the role you’re looking for. Identify the keywords that prospective recruiters use for the field you’re in and include these in your “Professional headline”. And to avoid flagging up your LinkedIn activity to your current employer, adjust your settings so that your connections are not alerted every time you update your status or change your profile.

Connecting With Prospective Employers

Social media is a very effective way of networking with prospective employers especially as you can use it 24/7. Follow, connect and “like” companies or individuals you’re interested in working with and build a relationship with them through sharing, comments and conversation. Join industry-related online groups to share in those conversations and to find out about events and job opportunities their members share. And sign up for job alerts from online job boards such as ours Source Creative Digital and Marketing Agency Jobs or I suppose (!)BrandRepublic.com .

Meeting Prospective Employers

While online networking’s very convenient when you’re in a fulltime job you can’t beat face-to-face contact. By attending industry events where you meet potential employers you have an excellent opportunity to impress and make solid connections with them. With both online and face-to-face networking it’s never a good idea to broadcast your job seeking blatantly (hints of desperation) instead indicate subtly that you’re open to interesting opportunities and new projects.

Recruitment Agencies Can Help You

Saving the best for last, recruitment agencies like Source are here to match candidates to their perfect job and jobs/companies to the perfect candidate. Contacting a recruiter who specialises in your field opens doors to jobs you may otherwise not hear of. A good recruitment agency has unparalleled knowledge and connections to the industry they work in. For the candidate this means you have someone working hard on your behalf to find you your next position. As an employed job hunter this expertise not only saves you time but also provides support during what can be a stressful period in your working life.

Move On Professionally

Finally when you have secured that new job remember not to burn your bridges – make sure you resignd and depart with good grace and professionalism. After all you never know where your next job opportunity might be and who might be doing the hiring.

I think most of us will have looked for a job whilst still in another job. Do you think this is good advice? I’d to love to hear some personal experiences – especially if you got caught out. How did that go?!

photo credit: woodleywonderworks via photo pin cc